Gene Sequencing Model x 2

What is better than having one model built of your amazing gene sequencing product? Having two made, of course!

KiwiMill is sometimes asked to make two replicas of the same object, fabricated simultaneously. Often one replica is used in a trade show booth, and the second model is shipped to the company headquarters for display. Having two models built concurrently can save on costs. Our model makers spend less time building multiple copies of a single design, which translates into savings for our customers.

This recently built gene sequencing model is a great example. The first copy was built at a faster pace than the second one, in order to meet a strict trade show deadline. It was shipped directly to the show upon completion. The second copy was finished up after the first one shipped, and sent to corporate headquarters.

The models are identical. The only difference being that the trade show model was shipped in a custom jigged hard-shelled Pelican case. the model will be kept in this case to be transported to future trade shows and conventions. The second gene sequencing model was carefully packed in a one way shipping box to its final destination –  the company offices – where it will reside permanently.

Consider commissioning two copies of your product. One for sales purposes, meant to travel from show to show, and another for display in the lobby of your company, boardroom, or executive office.

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Making an Historical Site Model of Ganondagan

Site Model of Ganondagan

This historical site model was created  for a museum in Western NY. The interactive display depicted Ganondagan,  a  community of Seneca people living in the early 1600’s. A large swath of land needed to be included on the site model, therefore the scale was quite small: 1 inch = 100 feet. With such a tiny scale to work with, the landscaping was particularly important, otherwise the model risked looking boring and monotonous. There were no buildings to focus attention on other than a cluster of tiny longhouses, and no major geological features to provide excitement.

The time of year the client wanted depicted in the model was early fall. Research  needed to be done to find the exact textures, shapes and colors which would realistically represent  this time period. The team at KiwiMill experimented with various materials to accurately represent grasses, trees, corn fields, and water at such a tiny scale.

Historical Site Model

The site model was designed to light up various areas of the landscape as well. The corn fields, wooded areas, water sources, walking paths and gathering of longhouses all needed to light up at the push of a button. LED strips were imbedded into the surface of the model and electronically connected to a control panel. The electronic knowledge required to get each area to light up correctly was complex.

Historical Site Model

Historical Site Model

The topography base was made out of a block of foam, and programmed and cut with a CNC router in house. The slots for the LED lights were cut at the same time using the router. Once the foam base was cut and sanded, the LED lights were inserted, the wiring underneath was completed and the extensive landscaping added.

Historical Site Model

Historical Site Model

Historical Site Model

Historical Site Model

When the model was completed, it was carefully wrapped and transported to the museum’s gallery for installation.

Historical Site Model

Historical Site Model

The resulting historical site model provides an educational tool for museum patrons to interact with. Check out these videos:

 

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