Tag Archives: industrial model

Furnace Model w/ Lift off Top

KiwiMill’s latest project features a furnace model with a lift off top.

The real product is a melting furnace , primarily made out of aluminum. Our model makers thought it would be a nice effect for the model to mimic the materials of the real thing, so they used sheet metal for the walls. This gave the model a very authentic look as well as making it sturdy for handling.

The roof lifts off to expose the interior of the furnace model. The interior parts were made with a combination of laser cut plastic and 3D print material. The I beams on the exterior and top of the model were hand-built.

Another interesting feature of this project is that two furnace models were built concurrently. If a client is considering having duplicate versions of a model, having them built simultaneously can help save on costs.

furnace model

 

furnace model

furnace model

furnace model

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Building a Scale Model for Trade Show

Scale models for trade show have many different uses. They attract attention to a booth by providing a focal point that potential customers can gather around. Everyone loves scale models. Whether they are static or motorized, full-scale or miniature, cutaway or exact replicas. Trade show models are naturally interactive and informative.

In many situations, the model will replace the actual product at the show. It may be smaller than the actual product, thus easier and less expensive to transport. Or larger than the actual product so that details can be appreciated up close. Multiple versions of a product can be represented by scale models, as well.

In the case of this latest scale model built for a trade show, KiwiMill created 1:3 scale replicas of a  fuel monitoring cabinet that debuted at AHR Expo earlier this year.  The scale model versions are lighter, and a bit smaller and easier to transport than the real products. There is something fascinating about capturing the essence of an industrial product in model form.

The cabinets of the model were made of stainless steel sheet metal. The piping was constructed from real plumbing pieces. The gauges were 3D printed with vinyl label faces. The motors and valves were also 3D printed.

See for yourself:

trade show scale model

trade show scale model

trade show scale model

trade show scale model

trade show scale model

 

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Mining Equipment Models

Mining Equipment Models

 

KiwiMill recently completed a series of mining equipment models. Three of the models were replicas of conveyor type vehicles that are used to transport material from one site to another. One mining equipment model depicted a scale for weighing material.

All four mining equipment models were made primarily from 3D printed parts. Even the tires were 3D printed. Some laser cut acrylic was added to each model as well.

The models are transported in individual Pelican travel cases to trade shows and sales events.

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Cutaway Models of Industrial Products

Cutaway models are a very popular way to display a product at trade shows. These two cutaway models show close up aspects of a full industrial skid shown in the 3rd picture.

By increasing the scale and adding cutaway features, these models seek to highlight key parts and processes of the overall skid. These products have special features that harness and convert energy. The cutaway models were made out of ABS plastic, tooling board, 3D printed material, plumbing hardware, and metal fixtures.

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Engineering Skid Model

 

KiwiMill was asked to build an engineering skid model of industrial equipment produced by Energy Recovery.  This product is used to harness fluid energy.

The engineering skid model is a combination of several materials. Aluminum pipes and plastic plumbing parts were combined with milled tooling board for the majority of the model. Smaller, more detailed parts were formed out of metal, or else 3D printed. Color was added for visual definition and orientation.

 

 

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Industrial Models

Industrial Model

Industrial models allow a company to demonstrate its machinery, piece of large equipment or industrial process using a hands on approach. Having an industrial model sets your product apart from the competition that’s still relying on a two-dimensional display. A color brochure of a product, or even a video demonstration will not deliver the impact an industrial model in hand does. A 3 dimensional model communicates effectively, answering specific questions about your product. It can also highlight the particular features or strengths that you want emphasized.

Often an industrial process or piece of machinery is too large, complex or cumbersome to travel between trade shows. A model, on the other hand, is portable while still being instantly recognizable and understood as a replica of your product.  No need to worry that the potential client cannot visualize your product accurately from a 2 dimensional drawing or photograph. While nothing can substitute for the real product, a quality replica can be a highly effective alternative. Its physical presence provides direct understanding about what you are offering and translates into a more positive sales experience.

A skilled model maker can work with you to provide an accurate, visually pleasing, detailed-as-you-want industrial model in a user-friendly scale. Specific features can be emphasized on the model, making it easier for your sales staff to illustrate your product’s uniqueness. Duplicate models can be constructed for multiple shows. Replicas are a cost-effective, engaging option when bringing along the real product is not feasible. No one should go into a presentation without this sales tool in hand!

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FL Smidth Industrial Model

Industrial Model

This mobile stacking conveyor is part of a system of conveyors that is used in the mining industry to continuously stack mined material. To demonstrate the immense scale of this machine, FLSmidth commissioned a 1:75th scale industrial model for trade shows and client visits.

Industrial Model

This was our very first project involving a model that was made of 95% 3D printed material. Drawings were created in Inventor for days. The 3D printer grew parts. They were cleaned and sorted. The model was painstakingly pieced together. Brass etched railings were added, as well as a conveyor belt depicting material being moved up it. A pick up truck was added (slightly bigger than matchbox size) for scale.

Industrial Model

Industrial Model

Industrial Model

Industrial Model

Lately, our model makers have chosen to pack our most delicate scale models in a custom-made foam and cardboard enclosure, before placing it in yet another layer of foam that lines the Pelican cases we often use.

packing a scale model

packing a scale model

packing a scale model

packing a scale model

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Shipping Containers Find New Uses Worldwide

trade show model

Shipping containers are one of those items you take for granted in life. The intermodal container or “sea can” is a reusable steel box with standard measurements that transports all types of goods around the world. Their universal appeal comes from the ability to transfer from sea to rail to road without having to take the contents out along the way.

There are tens of millions of these containers world-wide. Most of the containers are 8 ft wide by 8 ft high. Lengths vary from 20 footers to 56 feet long, with corrugated steel walls and a door at one end. They can be stacked on top of each other – all 8 corners have fasteners – and can carry over 20 tons of product each. Each container is marked with a BIC code to identify ownership.

Because of their relative ubiquitousness, and the fact that it takes so much energy to melt down 8,000 pounds of steel, these containers are being given second lives. An entire industry has sprung up with creative ways to reuse these containers that would otherwise be languishing in shipyards at the end of their useful shipping lives. Twenty footers in particular are in plentiful supply, as shippers have moved on to larger sizes over the years.

The most obvious second use for a shipping container is housing. Many architects have created eye-catching, unique urban designs  with the 20 foot container as their building block of choice. Other companies are focusing on 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath designs for USA consumers who find the reusable aspect appealing & want lots of square footage. Even more practical is the use of one or two containers to make reasonably sized homes for places and people around the world who need or prefer a smaller footprint.

The use of shipping containers as modular units in the building process is seen as an upcycling of materials. Not only does it cost less to adapt these units than it does to melt them down for materials, but leaving the units in their original state provides a stronger structure than conventional housing frames. Not just limited to housing, containers are being used for office space, retail buildings, museums and even works of art.

An off shoot of the intermodal shipping container is the expandable shelter concept. These modular units are used for deployment to situations world-wide that can benefit from ready-made, pop open, adaptable shelters. Shipped just like an intermodal container, these spaces then open up, or expand, to offer support services in the event of natural disasters or other types of emergencies. An excellent example of this are the ESS units offered by SAIC.

Intermodal containers are increasingly the focus of businesses looking to create a unique shelter out of a familiar design. Their modular shape, inherent portability, structural soundness and availability make these containers an intriguing concept to design from and build with.

Click Here for an interesting pictorial of shipping containers that are lost at sea.

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Cutaway Scale Model for Training

cutaway model

Our client, FMC Technologies, requested a working model of a gate valve that would assist with maintenance training. Talking with model maker, Scott, it was determined that the best way to serve this purpose would be with a 1/2 scale cutaway model that would pull apart and reveal interior components that could be manipulated. Once the general concept was agreed upon, our team discussed the build in general, and the associated costs and time frame, and a detailed quote was written up.

cutaway model

Once the job was awarded, model makers Mike, Dean and Scott came up with a plan of action including a list of materials, fabrication techniques and assemblies, along with a break down of each task and its associated steps. The over all design of the model would include an exterior shell opening and closing with the use of magnets, a working wheel that would move the gate up and down, and numerous interior pieces that could be assembled and reassembled.

cutaway model

FMC provided 3D geometry which was used to create the various parts of the model. Some parts were 3D printed.

3D printed model part

Others were formed from  machined  tooling board. An aluminum rod with threads was created on the CNC lathe. Metal gate sleeves were formed on a press brake, and some off-the-shelf hardware was added as well. As parts were formed, they were attached to each other as required. Magnets were imbedded in the outer shell.

model making

model maker

Most of the parts were then primed and painted. Various bright colors were used for the individual parts to enhance the training process.

scale model

The whole model was assembled and disassembled multiple times to assure its functionality and durability. The wheel was tested to make sure it moved the gate up and down on the rod correctly. The model was taken for professional photography, then carefully packed and shipped to Canada to our esteemed client.

Click Here for a slideshow of the model build on YouTube.cutaway model

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You Need an Industrial Model

Industrial modelWhen it comes to sales presentations, having an industrial model sets your product apart from the competition. A color brochure of your product, or a video demonstration will not deliver the impact an industrial model in hand does. A model is ultimately informative, answering specific questions about your design. It can highlight particular features or strengths of your product while providing the necessary focus and excitement to your presentation.

The product itself is often too large, too heavy or simply too cumbersome to travel between sales meetings or trade shows. A model, on the other hand, is portable yet instantly recognizable and understood.  No need to worry that the potential client cannot visualize your product from a 2 dimensional drawing or photograph. This direct understanding about what you are offering will likely translate into a more positive experience and increased sales.

A model maker can work with you to provide an accurate, visually pleasing, detailed-as-you-want model in a user-friendly scale. Specific features can be emphasized on the model, making it easier for your sales staff to illustrate your product’s uniqueness. Duplicate models can be constructed for whole sales teams. No one should go into a presentation without this necessary sales tool in hand!

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A Big Asphalt Plant Industrial Model

Today when I looked around the shop for the model maker‘s latest project, my eyes scanned the work tables for something small in scale. I couldn’t find anything. Where was the model?

It was staring at me at eye level, not on a table, but sitting on the floor.

It’s a seven foot tall industrial model of an asphalt plant. It will have all working parts. Anything that functions in an asphalt plant will be represented with moving parts on the scale model.

Why so large? Well the client has his can’t-be-divulged reasons for wanting this industrial model and the specific scale it is being built in. It makes for a great project in the shop. Take a look at some pictures of the job in progress:

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